Scientists fight for wildfire-burned land amid logging threat

Published by The Guardian, November 15, 2017

The US cashes in on timber from ‘devastated’ areas – but the land is actually ‘the rarest and most biodiverse habitat in the Sierra Nevadas’, says an expert

Less than a mile from Yosemite national park, Chad Hanson is wading through a sea of knee-high conifers that have burst from the ashes of the vast 2013 Rim fire. The US Forest Service essentially says the baby trees don’t exist.

The agency says that “catastrophic” fires have “devastated” parts of the forest, painting an eerie picture of swaths of blackened tree trunks like something out of a Tim Burton film.

But the vibrant green pines, firs and cedars surrounding Hanson among the patches burned during California’s third-largest wildfire tell a different story.

Keep reading online at The Guardian


The Damage Done - a two-part series on the Chetco Bar fire (Jefferson Public Radio)

Chetco Bar Fire, Photo: Liam Moriarty/JPR

Restoration efforts in the Chetco Bar fire in southwest Oregon are getting underway. While most of the area was lightly burned or even unburned, more than a third of the acreage suffered severe or moderate tree damage.

Federal forest managers are gearing up to authorize salvage logging in some of the more badly-burned areas. Local elected officials are pushing hard for cutting those trees. But others question whether the long-term costs outweigh the short term benefits.

The Chetco Bar fire in southwestern Oregon was the state’s biggest wildfire of 2017, burning just over 191,000 acres, mostly in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest. Seven homes were lost and hundreds of people had to evacuate from Brookings and nearby communities.

Read and listen to the November 2017 two-part series on Jefferson Public Radio:


(photo: Liam Moriarty/JPR)

Summer of Fire, Smoke and Ash

Why has this year's fire season in the West been so intense? Is this a precursor of what is becoming the new normal?

On Monday October 16, Dominick DellaSala was a guest on KBOO's Locus Focus. In previous conversations they stressed the important role that fire plays in ensuring healthy forest ecosystems. But after this summer of fire, smoke and ash across the Pacific Northwest, and now Northern California, how do we reconcile our understanding of the need for forests to burn from time to time, with the horrific realities now in our faces.

Listen to the full interview at


Fire management faulted in Calif. disaster

By Marc Heller, E&E News reporter

Credit: amissphotos / pixabay

Originally Published: Friday, October 13, 2017 at E&E: Greenwire

The widespread damage from wildfires in California's wine country could have been avoided with better fire management policies, researchers say.

A more consistent and thoughtful approach to defensible space around homes would reduce wildfire threats and is a better long-term approach than thinning forests far away from populated areas, said Alexandra Syphard, a senior research scientist at the Conservation Biology Institute.

Syphard, speaking yesterday at a forum sponsored by critics of the timber industry, said policymakers should stick to a "from the house out" strategy to protecting homes and businesses, and not rely on management of wildland areas to control fires.

Continue Reading


Please give generously today.

Donate Now

Initiative of
Geos Institute